A quick note on English language

As you well know, English originated in England. The British Empire, which then established its colonies almost all over the world, laid the roots of its culture and tradition in places where it colonized, especially its language – English. Now, even years after...

US and UK English: Chemistry, medicine, and others

Some chemical compounds have variants with respect to British and American English, e.g. sulphur and aluminium. In American English we replace ‘ph’ in sulphur with an ‘f’, hence sulfur. This is applicable for all sulphur compounds such as sulphuric acid, hydrogen...

Words ending with the suffix ‘-wards’

We often use the preposition towards, but many of us may not know that it is a strictly British usage. In American English, we omit the letter s and use toward. The same can be applied to forwards, backwards, northwards, eastwards, etc. However, there are some...

US and UK English: Some special pairs

Disc/disk Usually, we use disc in British English to refer to any thin flat round object, especially when referring to anatomical structures. For the same purposes, we use disk in American English. But to refer to the hard disk of the computer, or floppy or compact...

US and UK English: doubling “l”

We sometimes change British words with double l to those with single l in American English. For example, consider modelling and modelled. Root forms of this word is model in both British and American English, but in inflected forms, the end consonant l gets doubled in...