inebriated? is it not drunken?

by | Aug 23, 2010 | Uncategorized

A PTI (Press Trust of India) news item read in The Hindu begins thus:

Two girls, suspected to have been in an inebriated condition, lost control over their vehicle and rammed into a motorbike, in a high-security area of the city

Read the piece here.

Why would you want to say that the girls are “suspected to have been in an inebriated condition” rather than simply as “drunken”? That was a reckless driving by irresponsible girls. A young man and a child in a motorcycle were hit and both died. And the PTI (Press Trust of India) says the girls are “suspected to have been in an inebriated condition”. Why gloss over? Perhaps because the car “was bearing a VIP registration number belonging to a retired lieutenant colonel of the army”?

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