it is “-er” always

by | Aug 27, 2010 | Trivia

Everyone aware of the US/UK variant in spellings is well aware that words ending in “-er” in US spelling end in “-re” in UK spelling. For example, “fiber” and “fibre”; “titer” and “titre”. One should also remember that the converse is not always true:

Not all the words end in “-er” in US spelling end in “-re” in UK spelling.

Examples are “diameter” and “parameter”. Normally, geometrical terms (such as “diameter”, “perimeter”) and names of instruments (such as “ammeter”, “barometer”) end in “-er”. They do not have UK/US variations in spelling.

So does the brand “Tibre”.

Similar Posts

Which indefinite article goes before an abbreviation?

Which indefinite article goes before an abbreviation?

Seemingly simple decisions such as which indefinite article will go before a word can quickly turn into a difficult choice. While editors and most authors have mastered this decision-making, sometimes even experienced editors may stumble into a problem when an abbreviation is encountered.